Practical Notes from “Trust Me I’m Lying”

December 15, 2014 by  
Filed under Learn about Making Money

I’m 2 years late to Ryan Holiday’s book “Trust Me, I’m Lying“. Never much of a PR person, I learned quickly from his nonfictional account of being a “media manipulator” that marketing can be everything after you’ve built a great product. Since I have to return the book by 12/20 to the San Diego Public Library, I figured this is a good time to write down my notes as a blog post.

 

Quotes in “Trust Me, I’m Lying”

“We play by their rules long enough and it becomes our game” –

Orson Scott Card

“Social media isn’t a set of tools to allow humans to communicate with humans. It is a set of embedding mechanisms to allow technologies to use humans to communicate with each other, in an orgy of self-organizing… The Matrix had it wrong. You’re not the batter power in a global, human-enslaving AI, you are slightly more valuable. You are part of the switching circuitry”

-Venkatesh Rao (Entrepreneur in residence at Xerox)

“It’s a prime example of the feminist blogosphere’s tendency to tap into the market force of what I’ve come to think of as “outrage world” – the regularly occurring firestorms stirred up on mainstream, for-profit, woman-targeted blogs like Jezebel and also, to a lesser degree, Slate’s own XX Factor and Salon’s Broadsheet. They’re ignited by writers who are pushing readers to feel what the writers claim is righteously indignant rage but which is actually just petty jealousy, cleverly marketed as feminism. These firestorms are great for page-view-pimping bloggy business.”

-Emily Gould from Slate.com

“Companies should expect a full-scale, organized attack from critics. One that will simultaneously overrun blog comments, Facebook fan pages, and an onslaught of blogs, resulting in mainstream press appeal. Start by developing a social media crises plan and developing internal fire drills to anticipate what would happen.”

-Jeremiah Owyang

“Our illusions are the house in which we live; they are our news, our heroes, our adventure, our forms of art, our very experience.”

-Daniel Boorstin

 

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Timeless Beauty and Early Supermodels

December 10, 2014 by  
Filed under Learn about Style

Beautiful women didn’t just appear out of no where in the 21st century. In fact, the word “model” was arguably first coined by John Robert Powers in the 1920s, who first profited from using models to appear in paintings for artists. In the 1940s, along came Eileen and Jerry Ford founded out of New York. Then came Elite in the 1970s from Paris. The same founding agencies are still powerhouses today. So you may be wondering what earlier models looked like. Well, this is just my personal opinion, but they are surprisingly similar to the models today, except with a little more class. Keep in mind that the branding of models were different back then. In the 1920s to40s, models did not have a lot of earning power like they do today.

Here are 3 of my favorites:

Jinx Falkenburg – all class, a model and later TV star who got her nickname from her mother, thinking it will bring them “good luck”

jinx falkenburg

Jinx Falkenburg

Often confused with her sister Anita, Francine Counihan was a brief moment in the modeling industry. Later appearing in films and then leaving quietly to tend to family life, she’s the definition of timeless beauty:

francine_counihan_anita_counihan

Francine Counihan on the right, Anita Counihan on the left

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